Cooking Candy With Cannabis March 20th

This class will teach you how to properly infuse candy products with THC/ cannabis. This class is hands-on where you will be able to see a live demonstration of cannabis being infused into candy products (gummies & lollipops ). In this 4-hour class we will walk you through each process of a clean non-plant based infusion process. By not using the actual cannabis plant to infuse your product directly you avert pesticide, fungus, and heavy metal contamination.

Take this opportunity to enter into the cannabis industry on the ground floor in Illinois. With sales expected to top 2 billion dollars annually in Illinois (See cannabis sales #’s here) now is the time to enter into what is called the next big business boom and thats the Recreational cannabis industry. With Illinois adding the social equity component to the cannabis bill there is even more opportunity to get involved in the cannabis business if you have lived in a disproportionate area 5 of the last 10 years, can hire 10 people from a disproportionate area or have been affected by a cannabis arrest. Learn how to open and create a cannabis edibles business or just about any type of a cannabis related business.

Hands-on training: We provide hands on training to create these infused items listed below:

  • Gummies
  • Lollipops

 

Along with learning how to infuse candy products you will learn:

  • Proper use of security measures, procedures for responding to an emergency
  • Understanding the difference between topical products, edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products
  • Processor facility operating procedures
  • Methods used to create edible cannabis products and cannabis-infused products.
  • Procedures for handling products including procedures used to prepare, produce, package and store marijuana products
  • How to properly dose/infuse lollipops
  • How to properly dose/infuse dummies
  • Packaging, and prepping for cook

With the ancillary products sector of the cannabis industry growing exponentially, this course focuses on the edible manufacturing and cannabis infused products business. During this 4-hour course, students will also learn about processor operating procedures, employment policies, oil extraction and infusion best practices.

Who should take this class:

This class will show how to legally convert your current business over into the cannabis space.

Curriculum covers:

  • Culinary and non-culinary jobs
  • Proper use of security measures
  • procedures for responding to an emergency
  • Understanding the difference between topical products, edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products.
  • Processor facility operating procedures
  • Methods used to create edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products
  • Procedures for handling products including procedures used to prepare, produce, package and store marijuana products
  • Proper THC dosage procedures

This class is open discussion style meaning you can freely speak and ask any questions regarding Marijuana. We encourage and embrace all conversation.

Edibles Infusion Course March 20th

This class will teach you how to properly infuse food products with THC/ cannabis. This class is hands-on where you will be able to see a live demonstration of cannabis being infused into food based products (honey, oil, and butter). In this 4 hour class we will walk you through each process of a clean non-plant based infusion process. By not using the actual cannabis plant to infuse your product directly you avert pesticide, fungus, and heavy metal contamination.

Take this opportunity to enter into the cannabis industry on the ground floor in Illinois. With sales expected to top 2 billion dollars annually in Illinois (See cannabis sales #’s here) now is the time to enter into what is called the next big business boom and thats the Recreational cannabis industry. With Illinois adding the social equity component to the cannabis bill there is even more opportunity to get involved in the cannabis business if you have lived in a disproportionate area 5 of the last 10 years, can hire 10 people from a disproportionate area or have been affected by a cannabis arrest. Learn how to open and create a cannabis edibles business or just about any type of a cannabis related business.

NOW is the time to get information so you are next in line for employment and/or to open your own edibles and/or marijuana business.

Hands-on training: We provide hands on training to create these infused items listed below.

  • Canna-Butter
  • Infused Honey
  • Infused Oil

Along with learning how to infuse those food products you will learn

  • Proper use of security measures, procedures for responding to an emergency
  • Understanding the difference between topical products, edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products
  • Processor facility operating procedures
  • Methods used to create edible cannabis products and cannabis-infused products.
  • Procedures for handling products including procedures used to prepare, produce, package and store marijuana products
  • How to properly dose/infuse honey
  • How to properly dose/infuse butter
  • How to properly dose/infuse oil
  • Packaging, and prepping for cooking

With the ancillary products sector of the cannabis industry growing exponentially, this course focuses on the edible manufacturing and cannabis infused products business. During this 4-hour course, students will also learn about processor operating procedures, employment policies, oil extraction and infusion best practices.

Who should take this class:

This class will show how to legally convert your current business over into the cannabis space.

Curriculum covers culinary and non-culinary jobs. This class is open discussion style meaning you can freely speak and ask any questions regarding Marijuana. We encourage and embrace all conversation.

Edibles Infusion Course Feb 20th

This class will teach you how to properly infuse food products with THC/ cannabis. This class is hands-on where you will be able to see a live demonstration of cannabis being infused into food based products (honey, oil, and butter). In this 4 hour class we will walk you through each process of a clean non-plant based infusion process. By not using the actual cannabis plant to infuse your product directly you avert pesticide, fungus, and heavy metal contamination.

Take this opportunity to enter into the cannabis industry on the ground floor in Illinois. With sales expected to top 2 billion dollars annually in Illinois (See cannabis sales #’s here) now is the time to enter into what is called the next big business boom and thats the Recreational cannabis industry. With Illinois adding the social equity component to the cannabis bill there is even more opportunity to get involved in the cannabis business if you have lived in a disproportionate area 5 of the last 10 years, can hire 10 people from a disproportionate area or have been affected by a cannabis arrest. Learn how to open and create a cannabis edibles business or just about any type of a cannabis related business.

NOW is the time to get information so you are next in line for employment and/or to open your own edibles and/or marijuana business.

Hands-on training: We provide hands on training to create these infused items listed below.

  • Canna-Butter
  • Infused Honey
  • Infused Oil

Along with learning how to infuse those food products you will learn

  • Proper use of security measures, procedures for responding to an emergency
  • Understanding the difference between topical products, edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products
  • Processor facility operating procedures
  • Methods used to create edible cannabis products and cannabis-infused products.
  • Procedures for handling products including procedures used to prepare, produce, package and store marijuana products
  • How to properly dose/infuse honey
  • How to properly dose/infuse butter
  • How to properly dose/infuse oil
  • Packaging, and prepping for cooking

With the ancillary products sector of the cannabis industry growing exponentially, this course focuses on the edible manufacturing and cannabis infused products business. During this 4-hour course, students will also learn about processor operating procedures, employment policies, oil extraction and infusion best practices.

Who should take this class:

This class will show how to legally convert your current business over into the cannabis space.

Curriculum covers culinary and non-culinary jobs. This class is open discussion style meaning you can freely speak and ask any questions regarding Marijuana. We encourage and embrace all conversation.

Beverage Mastery Class Dec 27th

This class will teach you how to properly infuse beverages with THC/ cannabis. This class is hands-on where you will be able to see a live demonstration of cannabis being infused into beverage products. In this 3-hour class we will walk you through each process of a clean non-plant based infusion process. By not using the actual cannabis plant to infuse your product directly you avert pesticide, fungus, and heavy metal contamination.

Take this opportunity to enter into the cannabis industry on the ground floor in Illinois. With sales expected to top 2 billion dollars annually in Illinois (See cannabis sales #’s here) now is the time to enter into what is called the next big business boom and thats the Recreational cannabis industry. With Illinois adding the social equity component to the cannabis bill there is even more opportunity to get involved in the cannabis business if you have lived in a disproportionate area 5 of the last 10 years, can hire 10 people from a disproportionate area or have been affected by a cannabis arrest. Learn how to open and create a cannabis edibles business or just about any type of a cannabis related business.

Hands-on training: We provide hands on training to create these infused items listed below:

  • Beverages

 

Along with learning how to infuse beverages you will learn:

  • Proper use of security measures, procedures for responding to an emergency
  • Understanding the difference between topical products, edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products
  • Processor facility operating procedures
  • Methods used to create edible cannabis products and cannabis-infused products.
  • Procedures for handling products including procedures used to prepare, produce, package and store marijuana products
  • How to properly dose/infuse beverages 
  • Packaging, and prepping for cook

 

With the ancillary products sector of the cannabis industry growing exponentially, this course focuses on the edible manufacturing and cannabis infused products business. During this 3-hour course, students will also learn about processor operating procedures, employment policies, oil extraction and infusion best practices.

Who should take this class:

This class will show how to legally convert your current business over into the cannabis space.

Curriculum covers:

  • Culinary and non-culinary jobs
  • Proper use of security measures
  • procedures for responding to an emergency
  • Processor facility operating procedures
  • Methods used to create edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products
  • Procedures for handling products including procedures used to prepare, produce, package and store marijuana products
  • Proper THC dosage procedures
  • Proper marketing of cannabis products
  • How to obtain trademark registration for cannabis business

This class is open discussion style meaning you can freely speak and ask any questions regarding Marijuana. We encourage and embrace all conversation.

Everything you should know about buying edibles

Despite the perks, edibles tend to occupy a divisive corner of the cannabis world. Not only do brands struggle to comply with soul-shattering legal and political scrutiny like dosing caps, ingredient restrictions, and child-proof packaging laws, the edibles themselves don’t exactly have the best reputation with novice users

Deep down, there’s a sense of fear that surrounds the use of edibles, spurred by countless Maureen-Dowd-esque horror stories from confused newbies who accidentally ingested way too high a dose, and were then locked into navigating an unmanageable high for an uncomfortable amount of hours. 

What these people don’t know, it seems, is that edibles have come a LONG way from the magic brownie space cakes of yesteryear. In fact, edibles are technically the safest way to control the level of your high, with their extremely clear dosing restrictions and growing focus on microdoseable products. 

In hopes of clearing the antiquated stigma that’s tainted people’s perception of a really great way to experience cannabis, here is our guide to everything you should know about buying edibles.

Introduction to edibles

Prior to 2016, Prop 64, and the veritable dismantling of the edibles industry, the edibles market was a very different place. Funky mom and pop brands regularly rolled out fun products like dosed ice creams, 1000 milligram coffee cakes, cannabis lattes, and anything else you could possibly concoct. Creativity flowered as these little companies branded their magic products in wild packaging. It was a beautiful time. 

Flash forward to now, none of those brands exist. Along with legality came a slew of restrictions on edibles in California, namely a 10 milligram per serving dosage cap, a ban on any products with dairy or that require refrigeration, and packaging laws stringent enough to deflate any marketing team’s attempts at artful presentation. 

The edibles market today is made up of a handful of brands that managed to weather the storm and is mitigated mostly to products that fall into the following three categories: chocolates or caramels, baked goods, and gummies or hard candy. 

What dose works best for you? 

Nothing is more important than dosing when it comes to choosing an edible, especially for those nervous about getting too high. To better understand dosing, let’s cover the main types of edible doses you’ll encounter: 

Microdose: 1 milligram — 5 milligrams THC

Microdosing is the key for novice users looking to explore the world of edibles. These products, like Kiva’s Petra Mints and Dosies Sublimes, offer 1 milligrams — 5 milligrams of THC per serving, making it virtually impossible to take too much when following instructions. 

The most prominent trend in the edibles of today, microdosing is about feeling good, not getting obliterated. They’re great for productive workdays, family obligations, first dates, and anything else where you want to take the edge off yet remain focused. Start with 2.5 milligrams of THC and work your way up SLOWLY, meaning every 2 hours adding to the dose if you feel so inclined. If you’re completely new to cannabis, not just edibles, start with 1 milligram of THC. 

Medium Dose: 5 milligrams —10 milligrams THC

This level of dosing is great for anyone comfortable with being a bit stoned. Blurring the line between wellness tools and recreational pot products, medium-dose edibles like CHILL Chocolates are for getting high enough to feel distinctly, well, high, without feeling like you’re out of control. Great for hanging out with friends, going to a concert, hiking, and all those kinds of activities we can’t partake in for a while. 

Macrodose: Anything above 10 milligrams THC

Stoner psychonauts, assemble! Macrodosing is reserved for people who are extremely familiar with getting high, and extremely familiar with the high of edibles in particular. Under no circumstances should a person new to edibles take a dose over 10 milligrams. If you’re not new to edibles, however, Punch Edibles and Madame Munchie are great go-tos for an extra-terrestrial experience.  

What makes a good edible?

Now that we’ve mastered the art of dosing, it’s time to talk about what to look for when you’re choosing an edible to buy. What makes one edible better than another seemingly similar product? There are two main factors at play here.

  • The first, and perhaps most important, is the ingredients. Though it’s easy to get blinded by persuasive budtenders and cute packaging, always check the ingredients on an edible. If you can’t pronounce what’s in it, don’t put it in you.
  • The second factor to look at is price point. When it comes to edibles, you get what you pay for. If a product seems unusually affordable, there’s a reason it’s so cheap. To ensure a fun trip, spring for a quality product. A higher price means better ingredients, better weed and thus, a better high. 

How to save money on edibles

The best way to save money on edibles is to make them yourself. While the process may seem daunting, it’s actually quite simple, and can be a lot of fun.  

While there are a million recipes for cannabutter online, some brands have taken the work out of baking with cannabis with products like Heavenly Sweet’s 2000mg THC butter, Madame Munchies 100mg THC peanut butter or chocolate hazelnut spread, and Vireo’s infused olive oil.  

If you’re the DIY type, or just find yourself unusually bored in isolation, there are also machines like the LEVO Oil and MagicalButter that can weedify any carrier (like oil, butter, honey, etc.) with the mere push of a button. These devices are life-changing, and sure to open a whole world of weed-infused DIY products to spice up your lifestyle. 

Illinois Supreme Court orders consolidation of lawsuits by applicants challenging the recreational cannabis licensing process

The Illinois Supreme Court ordered the consolidation of lawsuits filed by cannabis dispensary license applicants in an attempt to resolve multiple claims challenging the fairness of the licensing process.

At the request of the Illinois attorney general’s office, the court ordered that several cases be heard together, which could help decide the fate of all 185 new recreational marijuana retail licenses.

The awarding of those licenses have been held up indefinitely by Cook County Judge Moshe Jacobius while he decides a case involving two applicants, WAH Group LLC and HAAAYY LLC vs. Bret Bender, deputy director of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR), which awards the licenses.

The Supreme Court Monday ordered that a suit by Magic Sparks LLC, against the IDFPR, be transferred from DuPage County to Cook County. There it would be combined with the WAH case, as well as suits by High Haven Dispensary LLC, Green Equity Ventures 1 and Hempathy LLC, under the heading of High Haven.

Attorney General Kwame Raoul’s office had argued in court papers that combining the cases would avoid potentially conflicting rulings.

The licensing process has been in turmoil since early 2020, when state officials delayed it, blaming the COVID-19 pandemic. In September 2020, only 21 out of more than 700 applicants were given perfect scores on their license applications, qualifying them for a lottery to award 75 licenses.

Many of the applicants qualifying were owned by wealthy, politically connected white men, in contrast to the goal of the licensing law, which was to give preference to “social equity” applicants, defined as those from poor areas or neighborhoods most affected by high arrests and prosecutions for cannabis crimes.

Numerous applicants complained or filed suit alleging that the scoring process was riddled with errors. The scoring, conducted by consultant KPMG, resulted in identical exhibits receiving different scores, while some applicants said they were never notified of deficiencies in their applications, as was required by law.

In response, Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s administration announced it would rescore the applications that didn’t qualify. Lawmakers also passed a measure to create 110 new licenses with easier scoring requirements. This summer, three lotteries were held to choose who would qualify for the licenses. A fourth lottery for six applicants who sued, challenging their exclusion from the lotteries, was pending court approval.

The lawsuits claim, among other things, that the law’s awarding of five points to veteran-owned applicants is unconstitutional, and that the rescoring process was unlawful. Magic Sparks claimed it was unfairly excluded because state regulators unfairly failed to recognize that its owner lived in an area that qualified for social equity status.

Green Equity alleges that regulators erroneously awarded social equity points based on the residences of its employees, not its owners. High Haven, Magic Sparks, Green Equity, Hempathy, Haaayy and WAH all claim they were unfairly excluded from the lotteries, and High Haven wants to rerun all three lotteries. ReNu IL LLC, Truerb LLC and Leafsie LLC, also joined in the suits.

The attorney general’s office conceded that the court may decide to rerun the original lotteries, or run corrective lotteries only for the excluded applicants. The court may also decide whether the plaintiffs would replace previous winners, or be awarded additional licenses.

Because of procedural questions involved in consolidating the cases, Jacobius delayed the WAH case until Oct. 28, but the cases are likely to take much longer to resolve. In the meantime, all the applicants have been burning money to maintain properties or employees, while not being able to open their businesses.

Data: Illinois Sees Record Marijuana Sales Amid Pandemic

Medical marijuana

Marijuana sales in Illinois have totaled more than $300 million since the start of the year, with July having the most sales of any month, according to state figures.

July cannabis sales hit $61 million, which is up from $47.6 million in June and $44.3 million in May, according to the Illinois Department of Finance and Professional Regulation and New Frontier Data.

One reason for the increase in sales could be the customers’ ability to order online, which many dispensaries started to keep lines down, the Chicago Tribune reported.

“We got a lot better at being able to get people in and out because of the online order reservations,” said Jonah Rapino, spokesman for NuEra, which has dispensaries in Chicago, East Peoria and Urbana and recently changed its name from NuMed.

The amount of money that customers spend at dispensaries has also increased. The average transaction was $126 in the first three months of the year but increased to $150 in April, May and June, according to Washington, D.C.-based New Frontier.

Greg Butler, chief commercial officer at Chicago-based marijuana company Cresco Labs, said the pandemic could be credited to the increase in demand, too.

More product availability could also be a contributing factor to the high demand. During the beginning of the year, there were some supply issues. The Tribune previously reported that dispensaries said they needed more marijuana and employees.

Butler noted that many facilities that grow marijuana expanded operation, and those products started hitting the shelves over the summer. Cresco expanded at some of its facilities and increased production at its Joliet location.

“With supply picking up, it has allowed customers to purchase that extra product or two that might not have been available,” said Michael Mandera, general manager of the Herbal Care Center dispensary.

Katie Johnston-Smith, 33, who was feeling “a good, healthy amount of panic” at the beginning of the pandemic, has started using marijuana a few times a week compared to a couple times a month.

Experts say she is not the only one. Many people have chosen marijuana as a way to decrease anxiety brought on by the pandemic.

“It was pretty nice because it did help me mellow out,” Johnston-Smith said. “I was like, ‘Oh, this is way better than mellowing out with a glass of wine.‘”